Russian music in Brunel Shaft

ARCC Anglo Russian culture club starts a series of four concerts in the most unusual place in London, here:

http://www.brunel-museum.org.uk

The first concert comes very soon:

Thursday 2 March 7:30 pm

Maria Gulik, mezzo, and Victor Maslov, pianist

Concert program:

Victor Maslov: Rachmaninov. 8 Etudes-Tableaux, Opus33

Maria Gulik and Victor Maslov:

Mussorgsky The Songs and Dances of Death

Mussorgsky Arias from Khovanshina, arranged by Shostakovich

Continue reading “Russian music in Brunel Shaft”

Here was Rome

Рим золотой,
обитель богов,
меж градами первый


Victor Sonkin, the author of this prize-winning guidebook to Ancient Rome, will talk about the everyday details of ancient Roman life, concentrating on (sometimes deceptively) simple questions of what the ancient Romans ate and drank for supper and how they calculated time. An authority on this culture, with public appearances from education, to television, and ship cruises, he makes the layers and quirks of history amusing, as much as his treatment is informative and in-depth.

Join us on Facebook

Continue reading “Here was Rome”

Literary translation during the Soviet and Post Soviet period

£7 / £5 conc. – book at Pushkin House

  • It is a truth universally acknowledged that Soviet literary translators were the best in the world (as well as cosmonauts and ballet dancers).
  • What happened to them after the Perestroika?
  • Does a new era require new translation principles?
  • And where does this leave the reader?

Most fiction published in English is originally written in English. In many countries, including Russia, the situation is almost reversed, and translated fiction dominates the market. Borisenko and Sonkin will talk about Soviet-era translation and its influence, the great changes inpost-Soviet times, and the challenges that Russian literary translators encounter today.

Join us on Facebook

Continue reading “Literary translation during the Soviet and Post Soviet period”

Comissar

Russia, 1967 – released 1988
Russian w/ English subtitles  >> play the trailer

A work of considerable artistic merit, Aleksandr Askoldov’s Commissar (Комиссар) is nonetheless most famous on other than artistic grounds. Based on the story “In the Town of Berdichev” by Ukrainian Jewish author Vasili Grossman, it is writer-director Askoldov’s only film.

Join us on Facebook


Continue reading “Comissar”

Resurrecting the Revolution

 Boris Dralyuk

will speak about his experiences compiling the anthology 1917: Stories and Poems from the Russian Revolution (Pushkin Press, 2016) and translating Isaac Babel’s Red Cavalry (Pushkin Press, 2014) and Odessa Stories (Pushkin Press, 2016) and read stories from Red Cavalry.

Join us on Facebook

Continue reading “Resurrecting the Revolution”

Shostakovich – From Jewish Folk Poetry

View the
music recording
and our
introduction here.

After his fearsome 1948 condemnation at the hands of the Union of Composers and Stalin’s ‘cultural’ henchman Andrey Zhdanov, Shostakovich was understandably careful about what he composed next and what he revealed in public. His position was undoubtedly dangerous. In the autumn of the same year he compiled a strikingly unusual  song-cycle for three singers and piano: the texts were taken from a collection of Russian translations of Jewish lyrics, mostly originally in Yiddish but one or two Hebrew or Russian; the melodies he created were original but closely related to the style of ‘klezmer’ music which Shostakovich knew and loved. The ensemble of three singers gives almost the feeling of a chamber opera.

Continue reading “Shostakovich – From Jewish Folk Poetry”

Innocent Saturday – 2011, Mindadze

See the introduction

and Q&A session here.

Screening and talk with the director

We welcome you to a second movie of our guest Alexander Mindadze. This, like the previous one, is based on a true story. As visceral and fragmented as life itself, the story is a dance on the volcano – relentless in style, events and characters.

Set over some 36 hours, the film begins at night, with Valery, an engineer and party official, running desperately to get to Chernobyl, rushing up roads and through undergrowth. The first we hear of events, it seems there have been some containable explosions, but when the camera wanders into a meeting of despairing bigwigs, it emerges that the main reactor has blown – as signaled by an ominous glow in the night sky. Continue reading “Innocent Saturday – 2011, Mindadze”

MY GOOD HANS – 2015, Mindadze

Screening and talk with the director

German with English subtitles. Q&A in Russian, English translation.

It is the spring of 1941. German engineer Hans and his colleagues arrive at a USSR glass manufacturing factory. The Soviet Union is to deliver raw materials to Germany – in exchange for the latest industrial machinery and technologies. It quickly becomes apparent this is not the whole story and both sides have the foreboding of things to come. Yet they meet as people and become friends.

Continue reading “MY GOOD HANS – 2015, Mindadze”